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    Nanjing, April 21, 2015
    It's the team's flight just as much as it's mine. Held up for 3 weeks by the weather in Chongqing, we were beginning to despair of ever finding a good slot to reach Nanjing. Andre had to return to Switzerland for treatment of shingles, so I took his place in the cockpit at the last moment.   What an unexpected gift ! The meanders of the Yangtze, disappearing and reappearing behind each summit; wooded mountains, sculpted by sheer cliffs and deep gorges; thousands of tiny lakes reflecting the setting sun; and here and there enormous cities of several million inhabitants, whose names I've never heard before.   And just beyond the lights of Nanjing, a triumphant welcome from the team, in proportion with their hopes and their fears of not seeing the aircraft arrive. A moment of happiness that gives me comfort at the moment when an sms arrives giving me news of the death of a person I was particularly fond of.   You can find this story on carandache.com
    Nanjing, April 21, 2015
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    Flight summary from Bertrand Piccard
    Flight was more difficult for MCC than the pilot. For three weeks the Monaco Mission Control team has been trying to identify weather windows to allow us to fly. It’s been very difficult to find simultaneously suitable conditions in Chongqing, Nanjing and along the route. Today’s flight is like a miracle, because the weather was bad yesterday and will be bad tomorrow: the MCC finally managed to find the useful window. It’s been fantastic we’re finally on the way to Nanjing, where we can prepare for André to make the first Pacific leg to Hawaii. For me it’s been beautiful but I’m disappointed for André: he was supposed to fly today. Unfortunately he’s been in Switzerland recovering from health problems. So I thank him. My main impression of flying across China is admiration for the varied nature of the landscape. It’s absolutely incredible. I’ve seen absolutely gorgeous, sharp-edged mountains surrounded by forests, dams to collect hydro-electric power and then suddenly huge cities, probably containing more people than the entire population of Switzerland! I flew over a special place I loved: it was covered with long lakes, all shaped like jagged knife cuts between the mountains.  Then, at nightfall, I saw thousands of small lakes shining red, reflecting the setting sun. Then I was swallowed up by the darkness as I arrived in the direction of Nanjing. I flew over some beautiful places that I’d like to revisit on holiday.
    Flight summary from Bertrand Piccard
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    Shanghai, April 13, 2015
    Solar Impulse is blocked by weather in Chongqing. Delays are accumulating. Our adventure is less easy than it’s seemed in recent weeks. André and I do one interview or talk after another in Shanghai for our partners. There’s no way you can tire of the amazing view of Pudong from our rooms in the Peninsula, where we are privileged to be invited to stay. The pace of growth in this city is frantic. For those who still had any doubt, the center of gravity of the world’s economy has indeed moved to the East.   You can find this story on carandache.com
    Shanghai, April 13, 2015
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    Mandalay, March 30, 2015
    I just love the unexpected gifts life brings. Originally, I was supposed to take off at dawn from Mandalay and was looking forward enormously to flying over the local temples. The program was disrupted by the need to arrive earlier in Chongqing, and my departure was bought forward to 3:30 am, in inky blackness. I was hardly airborne when illuminated pagodas swept away my disappointment. The spectacle fast became stunning, infinitely more beautiful than by day. Total darkness was punctuated with dozens of golden spots, each representing a temple glowing under floodlights. I fly north at low altitude up the Irrawaddy River, crossing Mandalay slowly. As slowly as possible…   You can find this story on carandache.com
    Mandalay, March 30, 2015
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    Mandalay, March 19, 2015
    Seventeen years after my second, failed round-the-world balloon attempt, which ended in Burma, here I am on the approach to Mandalay airport. This time it’s a complete success. André tells me by radio to expect the most enthusiastic welcome ever granted either to Solar Impulse 1 or 2. Behind me lie the Bay of Bengal and the Meghna Delta, where floodplains intersperse with meanders to create one of the most beautiful sights nature can offer. I flew at over 200 km/h thanks to one of my friendly jet-streams. And before me lies a country that rejoices in discovering that clean technologies and solar energy can be a source of social cohesion, peace and economic development. It is night. My landing lights aren’t lighting up any of the pagodas. I'll have to wait till tomorrow to wallow again in the special aura of kindness and spirituality that once made such a deep impression on me...   You can find this story on carandache.com
    Mandalay, March 19, 2015
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    Ahmedabad, March 12, 2015
    A mini-tornado shakes Solar Impulse’s tent and knocks the ventilation down onto the electricians’ workshop. Miraculously, Sébastien had left just a few seconds earlier. Danger doesn’t always come from where you expect it.   You can find this story on carandache.com
    Ahmedabad, March 12, 2015
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    Bertrand Piccard & Ulrich Spiesshofer
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    2 World Records for Bertrand Piccard
    On March 10, 2015, after an eleven-hour pit stop in Muscat (Oman) made by Solar Impulse’s CEO and co-founder André Borschberg, the attempt of achieving the First Round-The-World Solar Flight continued onwards to India. Bertrand Piccard piloted Solar Impulse 2 (Si2) from Muscat to Ahmedabad (India), flying across the Arabian Sea and setting a distance world record for straight distance, pre-declared waypoints record by travelling 1,468 km during Si2’s flight. The FAI (Fédération Aéronautique Internationale) reviewed the distance record claim dossier and declared it was ratified. Diplomas were delivered by the FAI Observer Jakob Burkard to pilot Bertrand Piccard after he landed Si2 in Nanjing (China). The record of straight distance, pre-declared waypoints 1,386.5 km was previously held by André Borschberg during the Si1 Across America mission in 2013.
The landing in Ahmedabad occurred at 11:25pm local time (5:55pm GMT) after 13 hours and 20 minutes of flight, reaching an altitude of 8,534 meters with a ground speed of roughly 100 knots. 
"More important to us than the world record is the fact that Solar Impulse 2 is the first solar airplane to fly in Asia. It is also an honor of being welcomed by the state of Gujarat, a visionary state which leads India in terms of solar installation”, said Piccard and Borschberg.

    2 World Records for Bertrand Piccard
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    Si2 Reaches Nanjing, China Successfully Completing Leg 6 of the First #RTW
     Swiss Pilots Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg Accomplished the Second Stop Over in China Before Embarking on the Historic Pacific Crossing.   Nanjing (China), April 21, 2015 – Solar Impulse 2 (“Si2”), the world’s most advanced solar-powered airplane and the first to fly day and night without fuel, landed successfully in Nanjing, People’s Republic of China, following a 20 day stay in Chongqing. With Bertrand Piccard at the controls, the solar airplane concluded the sixth leg of the historic trip around the world this evening at 11:28 pm local time China (3:28 pm GMT).  “My job as a pilot was relatively easy. The preparatory measures however proved challenging for our team of weather specialists and engineers from Si’s Partner Altran at the Monaco Control Center. We simulated all possible trajectories and exhausted all different strategies to get Solar Impulse 2 in the air; from defining pit-stops at airports along the route, to different speeds, altitudes and holding patterns. Throughout the entire process, the Chinese authorities have been unfailingly helpful and open to our ideas. We are amazed by the spirit of our team and the willingness of our partners to help us achieve our goal: The first Round-The-World flight without fuel” said Bertrand Piccard, Solar Impulse Initiator and Chairman.  This journey was also essential from a technical perspective as it was used to verify and fine-tune final elements in the preparation of the Pacific Ocean crossing scheduled for early May, pending favorable weather conditions. This last leg is bringing Solar Impulse one step closer to an aviation first – the next part of the circumnavigation will require flying five consecutive days and nights in a solar-powered aircraft to cross the Pacific, a feat that has never been accomplished before.  Commenting on the arrival in Nanjing André Borschberg said: “Nanjing represents a turning point in the entire mission; this is where everything comes together for us as pilots after initiating the project 12 years ago. This is the moment of truth where all the technical and human challenges will have to be overcome. We now have less than a month to mentally and physically prepare for what will be Solar Impulse’s longest flight to date: a five day and five night journey across the Pacific Ocean from Nanjing to Hawaii.” 
    Si2 Reaches Nanjing, China Successfully Completing Leg 6 of the First #RTW
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    LEG #6: Takeoff CHONGQING - NANJING
    Solar Impulse heads for Nanjing before crossing Pacific Ocean on its Round-The-World Flight.  Solar Impulse departed for its sixth flight from Chongqing Jiangbei International Airport at 06:06 am (10:06 pm GMT [April 20th]), heading toward Nanjing Lukou International Airport in the People's Republic of China. Bertrand Piccard is flying the solar powered airplane for an expected 14 hours across the country before arriving in Nanjing. Solar Impulse 2 (Si2) has been waiting patiently in Chongqing during the past three weeks for a suitable weather window to open - cloudy weather conditions and excessive crosswinds prevented an earlier take-off. During the previous weeks, Solar Impulse meteorologists and simulation teams have battled with unfavourable weather circumstances to find solutions allowing a departure from Chongqing sooner rather than later. Strategies explored included alternative routes, possible pit stops and flying at various altitudes. While considering several possibilities, the Civil Aviation Authority of China (CAAC) was very supportive, collaborative and flexible, for which Solar Impulse is grateful.
    LEG #6: Takeoff CHONGQING - NANJING
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    LEG #5: Landing MANDALAY - CHONGQING
    Bertrand left with Si2 this morning from Myanmar to Chongqing. This flight was one of the most challenging since the beginning of the RTW adventure.  This flight was the second last flight before crossing the Pacific and my last flight before this great challenge.  Bertrand flew over the Himalayas, resisted extremely cold temperature up to -20°C, and manage the oxygen mask for 15 hours straight, while doing inflight interviews with China and French News TF1. Air Traffic Control was challenged concerning the flight path they had to use and this added to the difficulty of flying through the area. The team noticed there were damaged cells on the aircraft and this impacted the battery level and energy available for a potential pit stop upon landing. He finally landed in Chongqing after a 20-hour journey. Schindler and Sina welcomes Solar Impulse in Chongqing (China) for the first time, the world’s largest municipality in the world. Si2 was on holding before landing due to wind turbulences and traffic at the large International Airport. During an inflight briefing, the MCC agreed that low battery level and weather conditions weren’t favorable for a pit stop,  so Solar Impulse will need to hope for another window for departure from Chongqing.  As Michael Anger, our leading mission engineer kindly reminded his team: “This difficult flight to Chongqing was a huge achievement for the team and this RTW flight. You are awesome!”
    LEG #5: Landing MANDALAY - CHONGQING
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    LEG #5: Takeoff MANDALAY - CHONGQING
    March 30, 2015: The solar aircraft departed from the Mandalay International Airport this morning at 3:36 am local time (9:06 pm GMT [March 29th]) attempting the most challenging flight since having started the Round-The-World journey, to reach Chongqing (China). The anticipated 19 hours of flying time and 1,375 kilometers of distance covered will be physically demanding, due to the prolonged use of oxygen required in the unpressurized cockpit, in which Bertrand will face temperatures descending to minus 20 degrees celsius. The flight will be demanding with respect to the steep ascent and limited time allowed for high altitude preparation as Solar Impulse 2 (Si2) will fly over the Himalaya mountains. Si2 is subsequently expected to remain at a flying altitude of roughly 7,300 meters during the majority of the flight.  
    LEG #5: Takeoff MANDALAY - CHONGQING