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    Shanghai, April 13, 2015
    Solar Impulse is blocked by weather in Chongqing. Delays are accumulating. Our adventure is less easy than it’s seemed in recent weeks. André and I do one interview or talk after another in Shanghai for our partners. There’s no way you can tire of the amazing view of Pudong from our rooms in the Peninsula, where we are privileged to be invited to stay. The pace of growth in this city is frantic. For those who still had any doubt, the center of gravity of the world’s economy has indeed moved to the East. you can find this story on carandache.com
    Shanghai, April 13, 2015
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    Mandalay, March 30, 2015
    I just love the unexpected gifts life brings. Originally, I was supposed to take off at dawn from Mandalay and was looking forward enormously to flying over the local temples. The program was disrupted by the need to arrive earlier in Chongqing, and my departure was bought forward to 3:30 am, in inky blackness. I was hardly airborne when illuminated pagodas swept away my disappointment. The spectacle fast became stunning, infinitely more beautiful than by day. Total darkness was punctuated with dozens of golden spots, each representing a temple glowing under floodlights. I fly north at low altitude up the Irrawaddy River, crossing Mandalay slowly. As slowly as possible… you can find this story on carandache.com
    Mandalay, March 30, 2015
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    Mandalay, March 19, 2015
    Seventeen years after my second, failed round-the-world balloon attempt, which ended in Burma, here I am on the approach to Mandalay airport. This time it’s a complete success. André tells me by radio to expect the most enthusiastic welcome ever granted either to Solar Impulse 1 or 2. Behind me lie the Bay of Bengal and the Meghna Delta, where floodplains intersperse with meanders to create one of the most beautiful sights nature can offer. I flew at over 200 km/h thanks to one of my friendly jet-streams. And before me lies a country that rejoices in discovering that clean technologies and solar energy can be a source of social cohesion, peace and economic development. It is night. My landing lights aren’t lighting up any of the pagodas. I'll have to wait till tomorrow to wallow again in the special aura of kindness and spirituality that once made such a deep impression on me... you can find this story on carandache.com
    Mandalay, March 19, 2015
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    Ahmedabad, March 12, 2015
    A mini-tornado shakes Solar Impulse’s tent and knocks the ventilation down onto the electricians’ workshop. Miraculously, Sébastien had left just a few seconds earlier. Danger doesn’t always come from where you expect it. you can find this story on carandache.com
    Ahmedabad, March 12, 2015
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    Ahmedabad, March 11, 2015
    Vast bouquets of flowers, embroidered silk scarves laid one on top of another around my shoulders, the incessant crackling of blinding camera flashes: I am torn away in a split second from the cozy intimacy of my cockpit. There’s no room for doubt - I’ve arrived in India! you can find this story on carandache.com
    Ahmedabad, March 11, 2015
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    Muscat, March 10, 2015
    It is emotionally easier to be at the controls than on the ground. I'm finally in "pilot mode" to cross the Arabian Sea. And, as a bonus, to bring the first solar aircraft to Asia and break the world distance record. But already there’s a bit of nostalgia for the extraordinary welcome that the Omanis gave André the day before, dressed in white dishdashas, with ​​colorful turbans and ceremonial daggers at the waist, contrasting with our prototype’s futuristic technology. you can find this story on carandache.com
    Muscat, March 10, 2015
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    LEG #5: Landing MANDALAY - CHONGQING
    Bertrand left with Si2 this morning from Myanmar to Chongqing. This flight was one of the most challenging since the beginning of the RTW adventure.  This flight was the second last flight before crossing the Pacific and my last flight before this great challenge.  Bertrand flew over the Himalayas, resisted extremely cold temperature up to -20°C, and manage the oxygen mask for 15 hours straight, while doing inflight interviews with China and French News TF1. Air Traffic Control was challenged concerning the flight path they had to use and this added to the difficulty of flying through the area. The team noticed there were damaged cells on the aircraft and this impacted the battery level and energy available for a potential pit stop upon landing. He finally landed in Chongqing after a 20-hour journey. Schindler and Sina welcomes Solar Impulse in Chongqing (China) for the first time, the world’s largest municipality in the world. Si2 was on holding before landing due to wind turbulences and traffic at the large International Airport. During an inflight briefing, the MCC agreed that low battery level and weather conditions weren’t favorable for a pit stop,  so Solar Impulse will need to hope for another window for departure from Chongqing.  As Michael Anger, our leading mission engineer kindly reminded his team: “This difficult flight to Chongqing was a huge achievement for the team and this RTW flight. You are awesome!”
    LEG #5: Landing MANDALAY - CHONGQING
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    LEG #5: Takeoff MANDALAY - CHONGQING
    March 30, 2015: The solar aircraft departed from the Mandalay International Airport this morning at 3:36 am local time (9:06 pm GMT [March 29th]) attempting the most challenging flight since having started the Round-The-World journey, to reach Chongqing (China). The anticipated 19 hours of flying time and 1,375 kilometers of distance covered will be physically demanding, due to the prolonged use of oxygen required in the unpressurized cockpit, in which Bertrand will face temperatures descending to minus 20 degrees celsius. The flight will be demanding with respect to the steep ascent and limited time allowed for high altitude preparation as Solar Impulse 2 (Si2) will fly over the Himalaya mountains. Si2 is subsequently expected to remain at a flying altitude of roughly 7,300 meters during the majority of the flight.  
    LEG #5: Takeoff MANDALAY - CHONGQING
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    Speech to the President of Myanmar
    I made a speech to the President of Myanmar expressing how important it is for André Borschberg and I to have the opportunity to stay in Mandalay the next few days. The 21st century is about exploration and adventure but this time around in terms of quality of life rather than conquest of the world. 
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    LEG #4: Landing VARANASI - MANDALAY
    Bertrand landed HB-SIB at the Mandalay International Airport in Myanmar at 19:51 local time or 13:21 UTC, completing the 4th stop on the Round-The-World route. Flying from Varanasi (India), it took the pilot 13 hours and 29 minutes to arrive in Myanmar where the team of Solar Impulse and the Si2 aircraft will stay for at least 3 days. From the cockpit, just before the descent of Si2 into Mandalay, he was welcomed by a warm message from the President of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar, H.E. U Thein Sein, delivered by U Win Swe Tun, Director General, Department of Civil Aviation, Ministry of Transport. Piccard also spoke with Serge Pun, Chairman of First Myanmar Investment and Yoma Strategic Holdings, Si2’s Local Partner. This destination was chosen to demonstrate the potential of clean technologies. This was an other record-breaking flight in terms of speed as Si2 reached a ground speed of 117 knots due to tail winds. 
    LEG #4: Landing VARANASI - MANDALAY
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    LEG #4: Takeoff VARANASI - MANDALAY
    After a short pit-stop to change pilots before taking off for its fourth flight to Mandalay (Myanmar), Bertrand Piccard took-off  at 5:22 local time (23:52 UTC). This flight will allow to test the stabilisation and augmentation system, as well as the oxygen as he climbs up to 27,000 feet. Landing is estimated to be at 7:30 pm local time (1:00 pm UTC). Bertrand was really looking forward to this flight because when I attempted to go around the world in a balloon, he failed and had to stop in Myanmar. Now I am coming back with a solar airplane, and on top of this, his daughter that he hasen't seen for the past month will be there at the landing. The pilots will stay at least two days in Myanmar before continuing to alternate flying the zero-fuel airplane around the globe. Over the coming months, Solar Impulse will stop in China, USA, Northern Africa or Southern Europe before returning to Abu Dhabi to complete our circumnavigation of the world.
    LEG #4: Takeoff VARANASI - MANDALAY
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    LEG #3: Landing AHMEDABAD - VARANASI
    Solar Impulse completes its 3rd leg of Round-The-World Solar Flight, landing in Varanasi. The innovative solar powered aircraft Solar Impulse 2 (Si2), successfully completed its third leg of the Round-The-World Solar Flight after departing Ahmedabad (India) at 7:18 am local time India (1:48 am GMT) and arriving in Varanasi (India) at 8:33 pm local time (3:03 pm GMT) after a 13 hours and 15 minutes flight. André and Bertrand were welcomed in Varanasi by Indian host partner Aditya Birla Group, where the team will make a pit-stop to change pilots before taking off for its fourth flight to Mandalay (Myanmar) at 5:30 pm local time (0:00 am GMT). Solar Impulse will stay at least two days in Myanmar before continuing to alternate flying the zero-fuel airplane around the globe.
    LEG #3: Landing AHMEDABAD - VARANASI